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Author and entrepreneur Seth Godin has a handy suggestion for making complaints—to customer support, bosses, or anyone, really—that will actually get heard and acted upon. The secret? Reverse your starting preface, and leave out the word “but.”

Photo by cote.

It’s easy to start off a complaint about your phone, your job, or your snow shoveling service by presenting your situation as an angry fact: “I’ve been a customer for X years, and this is ridiculous!” Seth suggests that starting your complaint with a positive assessment of where you’re at, followed by a little opening for improvement, will fare much better:

“In this economy, I’m lucky to have this job, and it’s almost perfect. It would be even better if…”

or

“I love owning this device, it lets me manage my life and contacts, and the one thing that would make it even better is…”

The important capping point is to never use the word “But” to make the transition between your satisfaction and your one niggling issue.

If customer service calls, in particular, are where you’re getting your high blood pressure these days, try a little reciprocity or being a “better customer”, in addition to some positive-thinking judo, to get your way.

Amplifying complaints [Seth’s Blog]

[via LifeHacker]

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At the end of every year here at Zen Habits (this is the third year), I write that I’ve had the best year of my life.

This year has been no exception.

I’d like to take a moment to reflect on this year, and to share the best posts of 2009.

Zen Habits has continued its amazing growth, going from 80,000 subscribers last year to about 150,000 this year. It was named one of the Top 25 Blogs of 2009 by TIME magazine. And it was just a really phenomenal outlet for me, personally.

At the same time, my book The Power of Less came out at the very end of 2008 (Dec. 30), and in 2009 became an international best-seller, helping me to reach readers in all corners of the globe.

But I did more than that:

  1. Created a new blog, mnmlist. Now has more than 4,600 subscribers and more importantly, is a fun outlet for my writings on minimalism. I created the WordPress theme for this blog and released it for free, uncopyrighted.
  2. Wrote a new ebook, The Simple Guide to a Minimalist Life.
  3. Started on my next print book, focus. Have released the first draft of the book online, for free, and will continue to update it online, based on feedback until it’s ready to be published.
  4. Created a new site, 6Changes.com, to help people create and stick to 6 new habits for 2010.
  5. Helped start a sister site, Zen Family Habits, with fellow blogger Sherri Kruger. It now has over 4,000 subscribers and is a great resources for families.
  6. Revamped the Zen Habits design to reflect the simplicity philosophy of the site. This evolution in design has included getting rid of most of my ads, getting rid of a lot of links in the sidebar and footer, and more recently and controversially, getting rid of comments. This last move deserves a full post, but in brief: there was too much comment spam, resulting in huge headaches for me, and the tiny minority of legitimate comments were mostly bloggers trying to get noticed — not that there’s anything wrong with that, but I just don’t want to spend my life moderating spam for this reason alone. People can still give me feedback via Twitter, and if I don’t always respond I do listen. Getting rid of comments has been regrettable, but they don’t scale, and it has brought peace to my life.
  7. Collaborated on another ebook, The Essential Motivation Handbook, with co-author Eric Hamm.
  8. Decided to move from Guam to San Francisco. We won’t actually be moving until June 2010, but we’re excited.
  9. Lost more than 20 lbs. as part of my Bellyfat Challenge (still ongoing but doing well).
  10. Continued running (in fact, just recently set a new PR for my 10K time) and working out (currently doing Men’s Health Homegrown Muscle series, finishing up Phase 4).
  11. Took a great family trip to Tokyo (read our travel blog and see the pics). Also: Why You (Almost) Never See a Fat Japanese (or, How I Lost 5 lbs. in Tokyo).
  12. Participated in NaNoWriMo and wrote 108,000 words for my novel.
  13. Helped Guampedia raise funds, developed its new site for WordPress, and helped it successfully relaunch using the new platform.
  14. Created (with Mary Jaksch) the A-List Blogging Bootcamps and successfully held the first bootcamp with over 100 awesome bloggers.

It’s been a great year. And for that, I thank all of you, my wonderful readers. You’ve given me more than you know, and I’m extremely humbled and grateful.

The 30 Best Posts of 2009
And so, without further ado, here are the best Zen Habits posts of 2009:

  1. Breathe. Breathing can transform your life. One of my favorite all-time posts.
  2. The Habit Change Cheatsheet: 29 Ways to Successfully Ingrain a Behavior. The best Zen Habits habit change tips all together in one cheatsheet, for those new to the blog and for those who could use the reminders.
  3. Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway (or, the Privatization of the English Language). My most controversial post ever — it kicked off a firestorm of comments and posts and debate. Fun stuff.
  4. Do Interesting Things. Another of my favorite posts.
  5. The Get-Started-Now Guide to Becoming Self-Employed. While being your own boss can be scary and a little risky, it’s not as difficult as people think. You do have to be someone who loves his freedom, likes to be able to set his own schedule, likes to work on things he’s excited about.
  6. The Little But Really Useful Guide to Creativity. While there are millions of creativity tips on the Internet, in this post I share the ones I’ve found most useful — the ones that I’ve tried and tested and found to be right.
  7. Love Life, Not Stuff. The how and the why.
  8. The Simple Fitness Rules. Fortunately, fitness doesn’t have to be that complex.
  9. The Lazy Manifesto: Do Less. Then, Do Even Less. “Simple Productivity” has been the motto of Zen Habits from its early days … and in this post I set out the reasons “Do Less” is one of my Four Commandments, and why it’s the ultimate extension of Simple Productivity.
  10. The Short but Powerful Guide to Finding Your Passion. Title says it all.
  11. The Simple, Ridiculously Useful Guide to Earning a Living from Your Passion. Title says it all.
  12. Your Life, Simplified. A 6-step method you can do today to simplify your life, without being overwhelmed.
  13. A Guide to Beating the Fears That Are Holding You Back. Having the fear is natural. Letting it stop you from going after your dreams is a tragedy.
  14. Ultra-Simple 3-Step Productivity System for Getting Amazing Things Done. I guarantee you — if you follow these three steps, you’ll be productive, and you’ll accomplish great things.
  15. Minimalist Gmail: How to Get Rid of the Non-Essentials. Here’s how I’ve made Gmail into a minimalist inbox.
  16. The Single Secret to Making 2009 Your Best Year Ever. Still applies to 2010.
  17. A Simple Guide to Keeping Your Counters Clutter-free. Keeping counters (and other flat surfaces) clear, clean and clutter-free doesn’t have to be difficult.
  18. The 10 Essential Rules for Slowing Down and Enjoying Life More. Slowing down is a conscious choice, and not always an easy one, but it leads to a greater appreciation for life and a greater level of happiness. Here’s how to do it.
  19. How to Create a Minimalist Computer Experience. I love a clean desktop, a friction-free interface, and simple tools that help me focus on what I really need to get done: to create, without distractions.
  20. The Little Rules of Action. And while I’m no proponent of a whirling buzz of activity, I also believe people get lost in the distractions of the world and lose sight of what’s important, and how to actually accomplish their Something Amazing.
  21. 8 Ways Doing Less Can Transform Your Work & Life. Doing less is not about being lazy (though being lazy is a good start) — it’s about focusing on quality rather than quantity. It’s about getting off the hamster wheel of productivity, so that you can create something great rather than just being busy.
  22. The Mindfulness Guide for the Super Busy: How to Live Life to the Fullest. It seems contradictory to those who are used to sacrificing living for pursuing their goals … but cultivating mindfulness will help you achieve your goals and enjoy life more.
  23. The Minimalist Principle: Omit Needless Things. What’s important is not that you have as little as humanly possible, but that every thing you do have counts.
  24. Get Less Done: Stop Being Productive and Enjoy Yourself. People are working longer hours, constantly checking their inboxes, constantly focused on Getting More Done. But to what end?
  25. 10 Essential Money Skills for a Bad Economy. The best way to avoid fallout from the national economy is to take control of your personal economy. From guest writer J.D. Roth of Get Rich Slowly.
  26. Dead Simple Guide to Beating Procrastination. For those of you who want to beat procrastination, here are 10 simple steps.
  27. How to Live a Better Life with Less. The beautiful thing is that you don’t need to earn more money or buy a bigger house or car or have a bigger company in order to have this better life — you need less of all of that. It’s attainable simply by cutting back.
  28. The Only Way to Become Amazingly Great at Something. There’s only one way to become good at something.
  29. 55 Ways to Get More Energy. You won’t be able to do everything on this list all the time — you’d tire yourself out trying to get more energy — but do try them all to see which ones work for you and your schedule. From guest writer Gregory Go of Wisebread.
  30. 20 Key Questions on Motivation and Habits, Answered. It’s that time of year — the end part — when people start thinking about their lives, their goals, their habits, and how to change everything for the better.

For more best of Zen Habits:

[via Zen Habits]

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Nothing but the strength of your convictions can keep a self-improvement promise going for at least 365 days. You can, however, boost your chance at success and outwit your worst habits with some motivational devices and clever thinking.

Image from Monina Velarde’s New Year’s Resolution Generator.

10. Roll 12 habits into one resolution

Blogger John Richardson believes in the power of habits, the kind that your mind can subconsciously stick to after 21 days of reinforcement. Rather than make some over-reaching resolution like “Be better about spending,” he crafted 12 different specific micro-habits to act upon in 2006, one for each month. The original link is lost to a WordPress re-design and site migration, it appears, but as Gina noted, by making those resolutions specific and measurable—drinking two quarts of water per day instead of “drink more water”—you can also track them, as covered below, and combine them into one big life-improving resolution.

9. Distract yourself at the moment of temptation

PopoutIt seems cruel, but researchers have learned a lot from tempting kids with an immediate sugary treat versus a more substantial treat if they wait it out. What did the kids who successfully avoided eating marshmallows right away have in common? According to NPR’s story on The Marshmallow Test, they distracted themselves whenever the lure of the fluffy white puffs became too strong—twirling their hair, counting to some random number, singing a song. Anything that got their mind off what it was consciously trying to avoid worked better than just torturing themselves over it, and we adults can probably learn a thing or two from those exercises. What better reason, really, to keep an engaging, entertaining game handy on your cellphone for immediate playing whenever temptation strikes? (Original post)

8. Create a reminder network

Before an action you want to do every day becomes a real habit, something you do without thinking and mindlessly benefit from, it requires a lot of reminders and dragging yourself to do it. To get there, learning trainer Dr. Stephanie Burns suggests setting up external triggers and reminders. Not just sticky notes on the bathroom mirror (though those can help), but a whole multimedia onslaught of conscious-mind triggers: clock alarms, devoted friends who call at the same time every day, rubber bands, locks on the cupboard containing the too-hard-to-resist treats, and so forth. Once you get use to doing the same thing, in the same place, in the same surroundings, you’ll have the efficiency of a self-winding wristwatch. Until then, it takes a stage director’s skill to set up an entire world of nag-y reminders. Photo by Haundreis. (Original post)

7. Pick only one actual resolution

The part of your brain that willpower stems from, the prefrontal cortex, is just behind your forehead. Like any other tissue in your body, it has its limitations, and overloading it with short-term memory tasks, stress management, and five or six different day-to-day resolutions is just too much. It’s best explained in the scientific studies highlighted by the Wall Street Journal, in a piece on the science behind failed resolutions:

In a 2002 experiment, led by Mark Muraven at the University at Albany, a group of male subjects was asked to not think about a white elephant for five minutes while writing down their thoughts. That turns out to be a rather difficult mental challenge, akin to staying focused on a tedious project at work. (A control group was given a few simple arithmetic problems to solve.) Then, Mr. Muraven had the subjects take a beer taste test, although he warned them that their next task involved driving a car. Sure enough, people in the white elephant group drank significantly more beer than people in the control group, which suggests that they had a harder time not indulging in alcohol.

… When we ask the brain to suddenly stop eating its favorite foods and focus more at work and pay off the Visa…we’re probably asking for too much.

Yep—one seriously taxing resolution is the probably the most you should fight for, given that your brain is constantly failing in an attempt to fight off drunken white elephants trying to get into your thoughts. Or something along those lines—we forgot already.

6. Use a timer

This year, you’ve sworn to anyone who’ll listen that your office will stay clean. All it really takes, you figure, is about five to ten minutes of pick-up every day, if that. Those minutes aren’t coming on an engraved invitation every day, though—you have to carve them out yourself. Do what a self-made millionaire mom (original link since removed), a finance blogger, and productive dude Merlin Mann do: set a timer and just crank on it. Nothing is all that awful if you know you can wander away from it in 10 minutes, and there’s something about the no-nonsense nature of a physical kitchen-style timer or stopwatch that makes it harder to ignore than a little screen icon. Get good at doing whatever you’re doing, and you eventually might not even need it.

5. Utilize public shame

Notable funny guy and Deadspin blogger Drew Magary has to lose 50 pounds to deal with back pain. How’s he getting there? Eating and drinking less, actually, but also through posting his weight every day in what he’s calling the Twitter Public Humiliation Diet. Maybe his followers aren’t calling him out every single day that he doesn’t make progress, but having committed to publicly fessing up to his weight is more direct and persuasive than a background thought about long-term health. Geek singer/songwriter Jonathan Coulton took on a similar task with his Thing A Week project, knowing that if his fans were waiting for new content every week and he didn’t deliver, it’d be humiliating on a wider scale than just missing a personal deadline. Don’t have a fanbase waiting to see you fall? Try telling your mom, or your wife, or the best friend who’s not afraid to give you crap, about this new thing you’re doing—you will not want to let them down. (It’s part of how Adam motivated himself to run a marathon in 2006.) Photo by a2gemma.

4. Make it into a geeky data game

The downward-sloping curve of your weight, the upward-sloping curve of your savings—for some folks, visual cues to success are understandably addictive and motivating. Lifehacker alumnus Kyle Pott used personal finance site Mint.com to get control of his fancy coffee spending, and Gina showed us how graphing your life with webapps can tame big stuff like budgets and small stuff like soda addictions.

3. Conquer huge backlogs with a DMZ or half-life approach

Want to clear out your inbox for the new year and keep it that way? Good idea, but what about the 1,438 items that are staring at you, just daring you to try and “process” them? Do what an out-of-time college kid does when the parents are visiting—create a “DMZ” space (demilitarized zone), and shove it all in there, heading back to it when you need to grab something or have the proper time set aside to really crank on replies/deletions/archiving. Can’t bear the thought of misplacing a crucial message? Follow Jason Clarke’s Inbox 0.5 approach, shelving half of your emails today, another half tomorrow, and so on, until you’ve stashed and sorted all your mail in its proper place without declaring email bankruptcy.

2. Set up a scheduled review

It’s all too easy to lose track of your goals if you have no idea how much you’ve succeeded, or slipped, as time goes by. The weekly review method that’s an essential piece of the Getting Things Done methodology is meant for tracking productivity goals, but getting into the weekly review habit is a good idea for any resolution you make. If you prefer a more intense, and far more old-school approach, try Benjamin Franklin’s personal daily goal tracker, which can be modified to fit your non-18th-century needs. (Original post: Benjamin Franklin).

1. Think progress, not perfection

You are not Vulcan, Cylon, or any other science fiction race that has perfect, programmatic willpower. You are human, and you will, inevitably, give into your cravings, whether on special occasions or when faced with gourmet tiramisu. When you do, don’t consider your resolution failed, but consider that any massive change will have setbacks and mistakes. As they say, moderation in all things—including moderation. If food is your particular vice, we’ve found foodie and Lifehacker reader Sally’s thoughts on low-fat eating to be inspiring. It’s not what you eat, but the spirit in which you eat it. Same goes for most anything you promise yourself, really. Photo by cherryjet. (Original post).

[via Lifehacker]

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Life change may seem to take years to achieve but there are steps you can walk today and in the next week that perhaps can change your life forever.

Most are little steps, but when combined together they can create big and lasting change.

Here are 7 ways to change your life in the next 7 days.

1. Change your words and phrases

One of the most effective ways to change your life is to change your attitude and mindset. And the best way to change your attitude and mindset is to remove certain words and phrases from your vocabulary and to replace them with others that are more positive.

It might take some time to remove negative phrases and words because you’ve gotten so used to them. But once you start using new words and phrases that are more positive, you’ll be surprised at how almost instantly people around you react differently and how you look at the world around you in a fresh way.

Your entire life changes without you having to change everything.

Here are some words and phrases to stop using:

– “It’s just one of those days.”

– “Same s**t, different day.”

– “Same old, same old.”

– “Pretty good.”

– “What’s the world coming to?”

– “Kids these days.”

– “I can’t.”

– “I don’t know.”

– “The good old days.” (thanks Tyler!)

– Hate – It’s such a powerful word that has become too common in our vocabulary.

– Retarded – I don’t know why people insist on using this word to describe something they don’t like or understand.

– Gay (requested by Max based on the same negative use as “retarded”)

For some ideas on what you can start saying to improve your life and make lasting, positive change, please read our article: 50 things to say before you die.

2. Count your blessings

We all get caught up and forget to reflect on how fortunate we are. So in the next 7 days take an hour and think about:

What you’re glad to have experienced – sometimes it’s good, sometimes it’s a bad experience, but it’s shaped who you are. For me, one thing I’m glad I experienced was poverty.

What you’re fortunate to have – family, food, shelter.

What you’re fortunate to not have – it could be sickness or debt.

3. Dust off your bucket list

Take out your list of things to do before you die and find something you can do in the next week. Or write something new down and do it.

4. Wake up claiming the Best. Day. Ever.

One day can positively change your entire life. And that one day needs to start with one good morning.

During the next 7 days wake up claiming that it will be the best day ever and try your hardest to maintain that attitude all day.

5. Try something you think you’re bad at

Perhaps you think you’re horrible at singing, writing, basketball, or some other talent. But perhaps you’ve just never really given yourself the time to attempt and if you do, you might find a new talent for yourself.

6. Declare your life’s purpose

It can certainly be done in a week with focus and a bit of work.

To help you, here are two articles you might be interested in reading:

5 easy pieces to piecing together your purpose in life

What do you want on your headstone?

7. Recognize change happens constantly

Every single day your life changes no matter what. Even if you go through the same routine over and over again, no two days are ever the same. Recognize this and even the days of adversity and pain will become bearable because you know that “good new days” lie ahead.

(Number 5 was rephrased. It first read “Try something you’re bad at.” Number 7 was also rephrased. Both were changed to get the points across more clearly.)

[via Lyved]

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You may think you know everything about yourself, including all your abilities and talents. But you don’t. You can amaze yourself with the tasks and achievements you can accomplish. A majority the time people underestimate and limit themselves. I know I always used to do it.

I decided to compile a list of 7 things you may not known about yourself. Maybe you did know some of these already or maybe you don’t believe any of these, but I guarantee that at least one is true.

1. You can change lives

Besides changing your own life, you can change the lives of hundreds, thousands, or possibly millions of people. Quite easily too. Just by doing simple gestures like smiling or kind things like holding a door for someone. Doing so will start a positive chain reaction that is difficult to break.

2. You can change the world

One person had the power to change the world. You also possess that power. You don’t have to be rich and famous to make a difference. Even the smallest actions can leave the biggest impacts on the world.

3. You have a sixth sense

I’m not talking about seeing dead people. I believe that each of us possess an extra “power” besides the five senses we were born with. Animals have extra abilities to sense weather, fear, and danger. So why wouldn’t we have an extra sense or maybe two?

4. You can have what you desire

One of my greatest pet peeves is when an individual seems something expensive like a car or a mansion, and says, “I’ll never be able to afford that in my lifetime”. Well with an attitude like that, obviously not. If you get your mind sent on something, and your desire grows more and more each day, you’ll be able to relax until you achieve what you desire.

5. You can be charitable

You don’t have to donate a million dollars to make a difference in a charity. Even $5 can help. If you don’t have money to donate, then give your time, ideas, blood, or whatever you can.

6. You can be famous

Andy Warhol said that everyone gets their 15 minutes of fame. Maybe you’ll get 15 minutes or much more than that. However, with the internet and new media, it has become much easier.

7. You have various talents and gifts

I believe that everyone is born with multiple talents and gifts. People just focus on one of their talents and are ignorant to the rest of the gifts they posses.

[via Lyved]

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Everyone has a story; some more compelling than others. Unfortunately millions of these stories go untold. However, thanks to a new site called MakesMeThink.com people have to ability to share their own amazing stories from life and read others.

Makes Me Think was founded by husband and wife team Marc and Angel. According to their about page MMT is; “…an online community where people share daily life stories that provoke deep thought and inspire positive change.”

They go on to explain their motivation for creating Makes Me Think; “Sometimes the most random everyday encounters force us to stop and rethink the truths and perceptions we have ingrained in our minds. These encounters are educationally priceless. They spawn moments of deep thought and self-reflection that challenge the status quo and help us evolve as sensible individuals.”

I personally can’t get enough of MMT. I check it at least once in the morning and once at night. When reading through the various stories, I find myself not only thinking, but going through a whole range of emotions from happiness to sadness to amazement.

Some of my favorite stories so far are:

“Today, I visited my grandpa at his retirement home. At 87, he always seems so happy. This morning I asked him, “How come I never hear you complain about your age like everyone else here?” He replied, “I have no complaints about growing old. Many folks are not fortunate enough to have the opportunity.” MMT” – by Seven

“Today, while I was driving my grandfather to his doctor’s appointment, I complained about hitting 2 red lights in a row. My grandfather chuckled and said, “You always complain about the red lights, but you never celebrate the green ones.” MMT” – by bange

“Today, I waited on an elderly woman at the local restaurant where I work. She left me a $90 tip on a $10 tab with a handwritten note that said, “I’m 86 and I can’t take this money with me. So please spoil yourself with it.” MMT” – Drew

“Today, my father told me, “Just go for it and give it a try! You don’t have to be a professional to build a successful product. Amateurs started Google and Apple. Professionals built the Titanic.” MMT” – by McGong

“Today, my company employs 130 intelligent individuals and turns a net profit of nearly $500K a year. I started this company 10 years ago after I was laid off by IBM. If they hadn’t laid me off, I might still be working in a cubicle at IBM today. MMT” – by Bill

“Today, I learned that not everything people say behind your back is bad. Actually, some of the nicest things that have ever been said about me were never mentioned to me directly. MMT” – by Dan

I highly urge you check out Makes Me Think and bookmark it.

[via Lyved]

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Life change may seem to take years to achieve but there are steps you can walk today and in the next week that perhaps can change your life forever.

Most are little steps, but when combined together they can create big and lasting change.

Here are 7 ways to change your life in the next 7 days.

1. Change your words and phrases

One of the most effective ways to change your life is to change your attitude and mindset. And the best way to change your attitude and mindset is to remove certain words and phrases from your vocabulary and to replace them with others that are more positive.

It might take some time to remove negative phrases and words because you’ve gotten so used to them. But once you start using new words and phrases that are more positive, you’ll be surprised at how almost instantly people around you react differently and how you look at the world around you in a fresh way.

Your entire life changes without you having to change everything.

Here are some words and phrases to stop using:

– “It’s just one of those days.”

– “Same s**t, different day.”

– “Same old, same old.”

– “Pretty good.”

– “What’s the world coming to?”

– “Kids these days.”

– “I can’t.”

– “I don’t know.”

– “The good old days.” (thanks Tyler!)

– Hate – It’s such a powerful word that has become too common in our vocabulary.

– Retarded – I don’t know why people insist on using this word to describe something they don’t like or understand.

– Gay (requested by Max based on the same negative use as “retarded”)

For some ideas on what you can start saying to improve your life and make lasting, positive change, please read our article: 50 things to say before you die.

2. Count your blessings

We all get caught up and forget to reflect on how fortunate we are. So in the next 7 days take an hour and think about:

What you’re glad to have experienced – sometimes it’s good, sometimes it’s a bad experience, but it’s shaped who you are. For me, one thing I’m glad I experienced was poverty.

What you’re fortunate to have – family, food, shelter.

What you’re fortunate to not have – it could be sickness or debt.

3. Dust off your bucket list

Take out your list of things to do before you die and find something you can do in the next week. Or write something new down and do it.

4. Wake up claiming the Best. Day. Ever.

One day can positively change your entire life. And that one day needs to start with one good morning.

During the next 7 days wake up claiming that it will be the best day ever and try your hardest to maintain that attitude all day.

5. Try something you think you’re bad at

Perhaps you think you’re horrible at singing, writing, basketball, or some other talent. But perhaps you’ve just never really given yourself the time to attempt and if you do, you might find a new talent for yourself.

6. Declare your life’s purpose

It can certainly be done in a week with focus and a bit of work.

To help you, here are two articles you might be interested in reading:

5 easy pieces to piecing together your purpose in life

What do you want on your headstone?

7. Recognize change happens constantly

Every single day your life changes no matter what. Even if you go through the same routine over and over again, no two days are ever the same. Recognize this and even the days of adversity and pain will become bearable because you know that “good new days” lie ahead.

(Number 5 was rephrased. It first read “Try something you’re bad at.” Number 7 was also rephrased. Both were changed to get the points across more clearly.)

[via Lyved]

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